Daily Archives: December 11, 2011

3 posts

Typical clears vegetation of bamboo rush and swamp aster. Image: Amanda Baird/DOC

The South-West

The south-west of Chatham Island encompasses dramatic coastal scenery, a fertile farming belt and forested catchments rising to a moorish tableland containing lakes and low peaks. The south-west supports the most extensive forest on Chatham Island, expanses of upland bamboo rush & Chatham aster and important populations of threatened plants and animals. It is the only breeding sites in the world for taiko and the Chatham Island mudfish. The largest protected area occurs here with the Tuku Nature Reserve and adjoining South Chatham covenant at about 2,500 hectares.

The tableland is highly distinctive. The flat to undulating topography belies the fact it is the highest region of Chatham Island at 250-280m altitude. The island’s tallest peaks occur on the tableland’s northern edge.

Weka on the hunt

What’s the story with weka?

Weka are part of the Chatham Island identity. Indeed, people born on Chatham Island call themselves “Weka”, as opposed to “Kiwi” for people born on the New Zealand mainland. And so it is a surprise to many people that weka are not native to the Chatham Islands and that they can be hunted.

Weka belong to a group of birds called rails. The Chatham Islands originally had seven species of rail but now (following the arrival of humans) there are only 3 surviving species – pukeko, spotless crake and marsh crake.  The three surviving species are widely distributed throughout New Zealand and the southwest Pacific, reaching the edge of their range on the Chatham Islands.

Chatham Islands Enterprise Trust

2011/12 Strategic Plan released

This strategic plan presents the five year strategic intent of the Chatham Islands Enterprise Trust (“the Trust”) and its group of trading companies. The structure of this document is a strategic vision and program summary followed by a brief strategic program for each trading company.

Detailed company strategic plans and business plans have been developed in accordance with this plan. A standard strategic plan would consider an in depth analysis of the history of the Trust, a Political, Economic, Social and Technology analysis (“PEST”). This strategic plan does not attempt to undertake a current positional analysis but refers readers to various expert reports that have analysed the Island situation and also the position of the Trust on the Island.